What’s in a name? Today PR&D changes to CR&D

Since the introduction of the Guiding Principles it has been really encouraging to see fantastic examples being brought to life, many highlighted through my blog, of Individuals and teams across the Council who have taken the themes to heart and are using them every day as we go about serving the people and place.

I’m very conscious it’s a two-way street and we’re ensuring that these local examples of living the Guiding Principles are mirrored in the way we operate as an organisation. So today is a very important step.

As you will be aware, the old PR&D (Performance Review and Development) system is being replaced and this week brings the introduction of CR&D (Continuous Review and Development).

Behind the change in name is a radical shift in approach and one that has been designed in response to the engagement we had as the Guiding Principles were shaped.

Employees from many different parts of the organisation provided feedback that was very similar. The message coming through was that staff want to feel informed, trusted, recognised, supported and valued – to know where the organisation is going and to feel proud of the contribution to the city whilst being supported and encouraged in achieving individual and group objectives.

To me that is a really solid base to be working from and in building the new CR&D the aim is to meet those aims for colleagues.

The old reliance on annual review is replaced by a focus on continuous improvement. You should expect regular one to one opportunities to plan and discuss personal and professional development with your line manager, with ownership of your own objectives.

Providing clarity on every individual’s role within the organisation is an important part of CR&D, not to mention the emphasis on recognition and appreciation for our valued staff.

To support the move to the new way of working, an online portal is in place to allow objectives to be tracked and updated on a rolling basis.

My thanks go to Isla Newcombe and her team, including Kim Wong, for the hard work and care that sits behind this week’s launch. It has been a thorough, complex and very worthwhile piece of work that will stand the Council in good stead for years to come.

Any new system and approach will take time to bed in, but I thank you in advance for your support for CR&D. It’s another positive step on the journey we’re on together and promises to change the outlook for each and every employee.

Remember, remember to say thank you for the 5th of November

It’s always been a memorable date, but the 5th of November brought not one but two major events for the city – and both were a great success thanks to the efforts of all who worked so hard on them.

The annual fireworks display lit up the sky and brought people from across Aberdeen and far beyond together on what’s always a lovely night of celebration. A break in the horrible weather we’ve been enduring was welcome, not least by the many staff working on the ground to make sure everything ran like clockwork.

Dawn Schultz and the events team from the City Growth cluster planned everything to perfection, with Stephen O’Neill, Danny Parrot, John Purcell and Christie Milne ably supported by colleagues from teams involved in everything from traffic management to communications.

Earlier in the day many of the same teams and individuals, led by Dawn, were on duty at the State of the Cities conference as the annual report by the independent Economic Policy Panel was published. More than 200 delegates signed up for a day that reflected on the progress to date in realising our economic ambitions and looked forward to the next steps.

I’m pleased to say there were no fireworks as far as the report and conference were concerned – the expert panel reported steady performance and forecast a return to growth in the years ahead, reflecting the prudent yet innovative approach we pride ourselves on as a Council which is leading the economic recovery after the obvious challenges associated with the oil and gas downturn.

A power of work went in behind the scenes to support the panel with the report, which is the culmination of a year of research and analysis, as well as in delivering the State of the Cities conference. Jamie Coventry, Gregor Docherty, Shevonne Bruce, David Ewen and Laura McAra  – to mention just a few – were all involved as City Growth and External Communications clusters worked together to deliver a very valuable and well received event.

With the public opening of Aberdeen Art Gallery going fantastically on Saturday and Sunday, it has been another incredibly busy and positive week. A special mention again to the Gallery team, if you haven’t watched the video on their reflections on the project I’d highly recommend it.

I’m very appreciative of the hard work that is driving all of these projects and events, with so many going above and beyond to make sure everything is being delivered on time and to the highest standards.

The next wave of activity will bring the launch of the Christmas programme and, as we have seen already this week with the gritter crews out on duty and flood response teams also called into action, the demands of winter maintenance.

As a busy city council the work never stops, but I hope all who have been involved in the events of the past week get the opportunity to catch breath, rest and recuperate. It’s certainly well-deserved and my thanks go to everyone who has played a part.

A celebration of another major milestone in Aberdeen’s transformation

We are at the end of a landmark week for the city and the Council as the eagerly anticipated reopening of Aberdeen Art Gallery draws near.

A media day on Monday served to give the first glimpse of what visitors will be treated to when the doors open on Saturday.

More than 5,500 free tickets for the opening weekend have been booked, with the two days full to capacity, and that demonstrates the excitement that is building. From an appearance on The One Show to visits from The Times, The Observer, The Guardian, Country Life, Conde Naste and everything in between there are new audiences learning about the way Aberdeen is evolving and the positive change being steered by the Council.

Before tomorrow’s public opening, I must take the opportunity to say congratulations and a very well deserved and sincere thank you to the many colleagues who have been working so hard to prepare – not only in recent weeks, but over a number of years as another complex project has moved from concept to design, construction and completion.

The video below, crafted by Norman Adams, tells some of that story in the words of the team and please do take the time out to enjoy their very personal take on an incredible achievement, it really is from the heart. My favourite section is on the new beginnings (from around 5:05 in the video), with the guiding principles of Team and Pride shining through.

With the redevelopment including the Gallery, Cowdray Hall and Remembrance Hall – three Category A listed buildings – there have been huge challenges. What has been delivered is a world class venue that will serve the city and the region as well as fulfilling the economic aims of attracting visitors from national and international markets.

I spoke recently about my admiration for the team effort behind the opening of The Event Complex Aberdeen.

Quietly in the background a very different but just as important development has been taking shape – with the the Aberdeen Art Gallery project brings the same great sense of pride as colleagues from across functions and cluster have come together through the different phases to achieve an amazing end result.

Of course the Aberdeen Art Galleries and Museums team in City Growth has been the driving force and special mention must go to Christine Rew, who has lived and breathed the redevelopment over a number of years. Supported by Helen Fothergill and the collections team, Deirdre Grant, Alex Robertson, Lorraine Neilsen, Jacqui Curtis and the hugely talented team of specialists, including our fantastic group of Museum Assistants, who serve as custodians of the city’s acclaimed collections.

From the decant from the Gallery in the first instance, opening of the Treasure Hub and meticulous fit-out programme it has been an undertaking of a scale and significance that can’t be overstated.

It would be easy to forget the way in which normal working lives were turned upside down for the Gallery team – so it’s important to acknowledge the way in which they have come through the disruption with great spirit and ambition.

Richard Sweetnam, as Chief Officer of City Growth, has played an important role in bringing the project to fruition – of course running in parallel with the push to complete TECA for its grand opening in the summer.

John Wilson and Stephen Booth and their teams in Capital and Corporate Landlord, including Neil Esslemont, Nigel McDowell and Martin Stewart, Simon McKenzie and John Stevenson have also been heavily involved and important parts of the Gallery redevelopment machine, with Fraser Bell’s legal colleagues and Jonathan Belford’s finance experts also crucial to the success.

The External Communications cluster has provided valuable support to the Gallery’s Marketing Manager Margaret Sweetnam, who is doing a sterling job in telling the story of the redevelopment to audiences far and wide, and as a lead in City Growth Dawn Schultz has been instrumental in supporting the Gallery team in planning the opening week’s busy programme of events.

Aberdeen Art Gallery first fell under the wing of Aberdeen Town Council in 1907, following on from the public-spirited founders who founded the Gallery to open up their private collections for the citizens to enjoy.

The project our colleagues have led is the most significant and inspiring cultural development undertaken since then – a once in a generation reinvention of one of the city’s most iconic and inspiring venues, one we should all celebrate.